Omnisphere Psytrance Presets 2

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Spectrasonics announces Omnisphere 2. The update adds an enhanced arpeggiator and dramatically expanded hardware synth integration, which was introduced with Omnisphere 2. Over 60 hardware synths will be supported with the new version, with brand new profiles for such iconic synths as the Roland Juno, Alesis Andromeda and the Roland D, to the very latest synths like the Korg Minilogue XD and Moog One. Hundreds of new patches will be included as well.
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Omnisphere 2.5 first look granular sound design tips

As it reaches its second incarnation, we ask: The last major update 1. To some of us, the NAMM announcement that Omnisphere 2 was in the pipeline totally stole the show. Finally it was revealed that Eric Persing and his team had been quietly adding features and content to what would eventually become a full Omnisphere version increment. Over new sounds and sound sources were added this time, which is more than many plug—ins achieve in a lifetime.

Existing owners are offered the upgrade at a discount and VIP Spectrasonics users ie. Omni Present The upgrade is available exclusively as a download, although new users can purchase version 2 as a boxed edition. You are also advised to back up the download itself once complete, in case reinstallation is ever necessary. Once the Download Manager completes its data—grabbing, installation proceeds as a call and response system, after which Omnisphere 2 can finally boot.

I was immediately directed to pick up an updated version 2. As before, there is no stand—alone option. This may be of little relevance to studio—based composers, but for anyone planning to gig with Omnisphere, a stand—alone version remains desirable.

In my wildest fantasies, I even dare to dream of an Omnisphere running on dedicated hardware. Understanding the refined granular engine is greatly assisted by the 3D visualisation.

Fortunately, my fears have so far proved groundless and existing songs have loaded and played without issue, even those relying on multiple instances. I only experienced crackles with a few of the new factory patches, typically those that were heavily loaded with effects or other processor hitters. Zoom icons are used whenever a more detailed menu is available, a philosophy that keeps unnecessary clutter at bay.

I started by whiling away several hours playing a selection of new patches. The friendly database easily isolated the v2 entries and revealed a treasure trove of sounds comparable to those that turned me on to Omnisphere in the first place.

Composers of cinematic soundtracks are going to love the many dark, evolving textures and subterranean booms, each ready to add instant class to any production. All are enhanced by the presence of a modelled Solina Ensemble. The list goes on and on, encompassing highly produced synths and sound effects by the bucket load. Aficionados of weird instrumentation and psychoacoustic sampling will probably rush to try the custom creations of Diego Stocco or the circuit—bent toy synths.

Myself, I gravitated towards the selection of rolling, brushing hangdrums and then on to radioactive stalactites you can play without fear of your nose dropping off.

The powerful Stack mode facilitates the splitting and layering of up to eight sounds. This is best illustrated by the rich, expansive pads, arpeggios and rhythmic patches.

Most of the solos are of the cutting, fast attack variety and my personal tastes are rooted in the flowing noodles of s Germany.

Finally, dance music has gained more prominence this time thanks to an infusion of EDM patches. This well—produced bag of churning basses, euphoric leads, risers and glistening arpeggios brings a welcome extra dimension to an already broad palette.

Wavetables represent a major shot in the arm compared to the handful of traditional waveforms formerly provided. Digital wavetable synths are also assimilated and whether you prefer the raw, grainy sound of a PPG or Prophet VS, or the smoother transitions of an Access Virus, Omnisphere 2 can cough up a decent approximation.

It would be no slouch judged purely as a DSP synth. Exploring the sonic potential of light bulbs. However, the bulk of the STEAM folder is occupied by samples — distinctive, well—produced, occasionally wacky or at least idiosyncratically recorded samples. My own folder has gained approximately 20GB from the upgrade and now stands at a bulging 64GB.

This is uncharted territory for Omnisphere, but I found it intriguing to audition the African chants and songs, sitar bursts, crazy Brazilian shouts and spooky erhus. To better appreciate them, we should move on and take a tour of synthesis Omnisphere—style. Synthesis A sound is built from two layers, A and B, with each featuring either a synth or sample—based oscillator. Whichever you choose, the source is treated the same from that point onwards well, almost.

This could involve it being twisted, crushed, bent, replicated or split into tiny pieces before being thrust into a dual filter. Due to the range of processing options it might never even need filtering. In raw synthesis terms, the stand—out superpower is actually a souped—up old one — granular synthesis. The updated engine is built on smaller grains and this results in a more refined, abstract quality to the output — and a greater demand for CPU.

The earlier mode remains available both for backwards compatibility and because it still sounds cool in its own right. To further help you out, the 3D visualisation produces instant feedback from each control and, should you require a more thorough explanation, the manual is never more than a few clicks away. By the simple act of manipulating the Speed slider you can morph seamlessly between time—stretching and compression, to great effect.

Moving the position around can dynamically reorganise any phrase and turn it into a glitched—out, CD—sticking mash—up. Better still, assign an LFO to do it for you, then sit back and enjoy. Recording more grist for the Omnisphere mill. The ring modulator and FM implementation both incorporate the extra wavetables as potential modulators.

Harmonia, with its additional four oscillators per layer, can access them too. As a further protection against CPU wipeout, only one of the three heavyweight processes Unison, Harmonia or Granular can be used per layer. In this outing, the well—stocked library of filters has grown by eight entries, including vowel, power and resonator types.

Matching past configurations, each layer has a dual filter and either serial or parallel operation. Amongst the remaining minor enhancements, I appreciated the left—hand modulation pane and its graphical representation of modulation depth.

The mod section, with its friendly matrix view and ease of assignment, has been boosted with more targets and destinations, plus a polyphonic LFO and Polyphonic Mod Envelope.

Worthy though such features are, I doubt they set the pulse and processors racing as much as the last stop in the audio chain: To help you get more from these, four auxiliary effect slots join the existing layer and common routings.

So not only do you have more effects per sound, you can better differentiate between inserts and sends. Furthermore, since the effects are tied into the mod matrix, they can be integrated into sound design as naturally as sweeping the filter cutoff or a wavetable.

The Sound Match process places the most similar patches at the top. Of the new types, Innerspace made the most dramatic impact. It works in a similar fashion to a convolution reverb, imprinting the resonances from a large catalogue of spaces onto your sound.

Two unique spaces are available simultaneously to be blended or morphed to taste, the choices ranging from dripping water and scraping strings, to recordings of rain, fire and jingling glasses, plus multiple objects being hit and many more. Innerspace is a surefire treat for ambient composers everywhere. It consists of four parallel comb filters producing tuned metallic resonance with a surprising degree of lushness.

At the other end of the lushness scale, dirt seekers may enjoy the range of budget—focused speakers and amps. Particularly recommended is the delightfully named Thriftshop Speaker, an effect that concentrates on cheap and nasty tonality, for example, tube radios, Korg Monotrons or Stylophones, the latter fronted by the image of a youthful Rolf Harris.

Lastly, who can resist a software homage to the Solina Ensemble? Not me for one. Browser Yowser! This term might once have caused ELP roadies to reach for their trusses, but here it refers to an optimised means of loading sounds. In practice you can usually start playing the moment your selection is made rather than having to wait for long samples to be read from disk. Of the other browser power—ups, Sound Match will summon a list of patches similar to the current selection.

You might think Omnisphere already had more choices than a FIFA official at a lavish banquet, but this version gives you even more opportunities to agonise over slight variations. The indecisive should approach this tool with caution. A synth layer primed with one of the many new wavetables. This feature introduces an extra level of control to the act of browsing whereby if you discover a favoured arpeggio pattern or effect combination, those sections can be carried forward into future search results.

Patch—sharing is easier too, thanks to a simple two—stage process. First you assemble a project, batching together related sounds, multis and user sources.

In adding audio import capability, Spectrasonics have opted for a relatively basic approach and although I applaud the simplicity and ease of use, I did feel a few more options would have reaped great rewards, especially where loop handling is concerned. The lengths Spectrasonics went to to capture sounds really are impressive. Of the other synthesis updates, the improved granular engine is a superb tool for dismembering samples and plucking weird textures from them.

With the improvements to FM and ring modulation and wavetable synthesis as icing on the cake, this is a solid upgrade that successfully avoids any sense of bloat or feature—creep. Great stuff! With new sounds numbering in their thousands and a search facility that delivers the inspirational as a matter of routine, upgrading still seems like a no—brainer to me, whether you care for the technical advances or not.

The best software synth just got better. Audio Import Obeying the same simple—yet—powerful rule running through Omnisphere, audio import is so uncomplicated it could easily be missed. Yet it addresses what some felt was an important omission. Initially the samples are stored in a sub folder named according to the creation date. Indeed, if you expect to make extensive use of original audio, now might be the ideal time to consider the location of your folder.

For Mac users at least, this defaults to the system drive. I imported a random spread of samples without issue, choosing a selection from short hits and synth bleeps to lengthy field recordings of streams and birdsong. If you want to truncate a sample, this is accomplished with envelopes; similarly, if you want a sample to loop, you have to fire it up in an external audio editor prior to import.

If unspecified, the sample is assumed to be pitched at C3, but this can be changed either in your editor or by including the desired note in the sample name. When using a sample as a looping atmosphere or ambience, I found it helpful to avoid the adverse effects of transposition by deactivating keyboard tracking of pitch.

On the plus side, you can layer and split up to eight different sounds in Multi mode. Actually, Multi mode is a far more efficient means of playing several sounds at once — much better than running multiple instances of Omnisphere. A further benefit of combining multiple sounds is the scope to layer up to eight arpeggios.

Spectrasonics Omnisphere 2.5

It’s the proverbial carrot on a string that keeps our minds engaged and ears yearning for more. And since Revolve is genre-agnostic, you’ll find plenty of inspiration whether you’re working on the next soundtrack for a suspense-thriller, chilling down with ambient, going pop with a vocal melody on top, or creating heat for the dance floor. Modular synthesis. A vast frontier of new and unusual sonic possibilities as well as a endless drain on your bank account — for those simply trying to keep up with regular advancements in technology. As the name suggests, every patch ranges from overtly aggressive to warm and serene.

VIDEO: Installing Omnisphere Patches – All Articles

Omnisphere includes new patches, expanded hardware synth integration, and arpeggiator upgrades such as new Pattern modes, step dividers, pitch. Omnisphere 2 is like universe of sound design and creation in a plug-in. But rather than simply going by the presets, Lynda Arnold is here to. Omnisphere first look. I created a video to show some of the new exciting features of Omnisphere Sound Design with the new Granular.

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